Take off this summer with our Sky High Science issue!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Sky high science

Wouldn’t it be amazing to fly like a bird? Or how do you fancy fluttering like a butterfly, or even soaring like a snake?! There are all sorts of flying phenomena to discover this issue. Have a go at making your own stunt plane, investigating different designs of straw planes and testing aerofoils. We interview Palaeontologist Liz Martin-Silverstone to ask her how on earth the giant pterosaurs were able to fly, plus we find out how drones work, and answer the question on lots of people’s minds… just how do planes fly???

Buy this issue here and fill your summer holidays with awesome science fun!! 🦋 ✈ 🚁

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Illustration of a peppered moth

WIN! Moth, An evolution story by Isabel Thomas

Mothnight competition to win Moth by Isabel Thomas

To celebrate #MothNight2018 we’ve got a copy of this beautiful book, MOTH, by Isabel Thomas (one of our Whizz Pop Bang writers). Written for younger children, this is the retelling of the story of the peppered moth. A true tale, and ideal introduction to natural selection and evolution for children.

“This is the story of light and dark…”

Enter by answering this question in the comment box below:

What sort of moth is this story about?

A. Salted moth

B. Sugared moth

C. Peppered moth

Enter by midnight on Sunday 17th June. By entering this competition you agree to the terms and conditions on our website. Thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing for this book.

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Agnes Arber photo in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

Scientists from history

Each month we celebrate a sensational scientist from history; an eminent figure in the creation, invention or discovery of a scientific breakthrough. How many famous scientists can you name? How many of those are women? Female scientists were often forgotten or unknown, simply because they were women. And yet their work was instrumental in discovering hugely important scientific breakthroughs.

Inside Whizz Pop Bang magazine your kids will discover the historic world of science; who invented computers, who discovered the milky way and who is responsible for how we forecast the weather. We tell the story of these fascinating scientists, both male and female, and how they came to discover incredible things.

A few examples of the less well-known women we’ve featured: Lise Meitner, whose work led to the discovery of nuclear fission, astronomer Caroline Herschel and Agnes Arber, botanist and early ambassador in helping the world to recognize the amazing talent of women in science. Read the full list of sensational scientists below.

The story of Agnes Arber in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

List of the sensational scientists featured in Whizz Pop Bang magazine:

Issue 1: Mary Anning

Issue 2: Charles Darwin

Issue 3: Maria Telkes

Issue 4: Leonardo da Vinci

Issue 5: Lise Meitner

Issue 6: Louis Pasteur

Issue 7: Rosalind Franklin

Issue 8: Antoine Lavoisier

Issue 9: Mary Somerville

Issue 10: Charles Lyell

Issue 11: Caroline Herschel

Issue 12: Jacques Cousteau

Issue 13: Grace Hopper

Issue 14: Roy Chapman Andrews

Issue 15: William Henry Perkin

Issue 16: Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Issue 17: Florence Nightingale

Issue 18: Albert Einstein

Issue 19: Gregor Mendel

Issue 20: Rachel Carson

Issue 21: Ibn al Haytham

Issue 22: Richard Feynman

Issue 23: Agnes Arber

Issue 24: Alfred Wegener

Issue 25: Jeanne Villepreux-Power

Issue 26: George de Mestral, velcro

Issue 27: Marie Curie

Issue 28: Nicolaus Copernicus

Issue 29: Hedy Lamarr

Issue 30: Archimedes

Issue 31: Anselmus De Boot

Issue 32: Joseph Bazalgette

Issue 33: Charles Darwin

Issue 34: Michael Faraday

Issue 35: Gerty Cori

To buy a back issue for just £3.75 (with free UK delivery!) visit our shop.

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Nikita Hari photo

Whizz Pop Bang interviews with science heroes!

Whizz Pop Bang Interview with Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari

Each month we interview a SCIENCE HERO to find out what real scientists do in their jobs. This is where we ensure we have a real mix of male and female scientists to inspire girls and boys, and particularly showcase women in STEM roles. Breaking down gender stereotypes is an important part of Whizz Pop Bang magazine as we strive for a future of equality.

Many of the scientists we interview are happy to be contacted by readers who have their own questions, a great opportunity to chat to real scientists! We love this tweet from Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari who’s passionate about inspiring kids into science, especially girls…

Inspiring tweet from Nikita Hari electrical engineer

 

Are your kids super curious, always asking questions and exploring new ideas? Help them to nurture their natural curiosity with Whizz Pop Bang! Here’s a list of the 35 scientists we’ve interviewed to date:

Issue 1: Beccy Smith, Chocolate scientist

Issue 2: Karen Ladenheim, Robotics scientist, Stanford University

Issue 3: Lynn Whitfield, Bat ecologist

Issue 4: Dr Steve Brusatte, Palaeontologist, Edinburgh University

Issue 5: Rob Lambert, Antarctic explorer and polar scientist

Issue 6: Tim Peake, Astronaut

Issue 7: Susan Cheyne, Conservation biologist (orangutans)

Issue 8: Misha Lotto, young scientist, Blackawton Bees Project

Issue 9: Josie Campbell, Vet

Issue 10: Shane Cronin, Volcanologist (New Zealand)

Issue 11: Jennifer Andon, Entomologist

Issue 12: Dr Maddalena Bearsi, Marine biologist

Issue 13: Prof Robert Winston, Medical scientist, Imperial College

Issue 14: Sarah Shelley, Fossil hunter

Issue 15: Helen Czerski, Bubble scientist

Issue 16: Abbie Hutty, Mars Rover engineer

Issue 17: Lara Aknin, Psychology professor (gift-giving)

Issue 18: Emma Burke, Penguin aquarist

Issue 19: Ian Gilby, Primatologist, Tanzania

Issue 20: Caoimhe Doyle, Foley Artist, sound effect engineer

Issue 21: Amy Dejong, Food scientist, University of Wisconsin

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a nanotechnologist

Issue 22: Payton Barnwell, Nanotechnologist, Florida Polytechnic Uni

Issue 23: Dave Goulson, Bumblebee biologist

Issue 24: Huw James, Science adventurer

Issue 25: Alex Hildred, Maritime archaeologist

Issue 26: Cierra Martin, Seed guardian

Issue 27: Toby Gemmill, Orthopaedic vet

Issue 28: Dr Sheyna, Martian (sort of!)

Issue 29: Richard Stammers, Visual effects artist

Issue 30: Andres Ruzo, Geothermal Scientist

Issue 31: Lisa Elser, Gem cutter

Issue 32: Pratap Pullammanappallil, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida, USA 

Issue 33: Dr Nicola Rooney, Research Fellow in the Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group at the University of Bristol

Issue 34: Nikita Hari, Electrical Engineer

Issue 35: Barry Drust, Professor of Exercise Physiology

Whizz Pop Bang magazine has helped to inspire lots of girls and boys to want to be scientists when they grow up! To buy a back issue (for just £3.75 inc UK delivery) visit our back issues shop or you can sign up for monthly magazines by post – simply subscribe online.

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Win this icon

WIN! A signed copy of The Matilda Effect by Ellie Irving

The Matilda Effect three copies

We’ve got three signed copies of The Matilda Effect to giveaway!

Matilda loves science and inventing. Her heroes are Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci and Thomas Edison, and one day she wants to be a famous inventor herself. So when she doesn’t win the school science fair, she’s devastated – especially as the judges didn’t believe she’d come up with her entry on her own. Because she’s a girl…

To enter this competition tell us what Marie Curie helped to develop, was it…
a) x-ray
b) blu-ray
c) sting ray antivenom

Answer below in the comment box 👇🏽 by midnight on 31st March 2018.

 

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January’s book competition

The DNA Detectives: Catch a Thief

 

This month we have a slightly different book competition for kids to enter, to help launch a brand new storybook ‘The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief’ written by Dr Mandy Hartley. Whilst there are lots of excellent reviews for this book, they are written by parents and Mandy would love to hear what children think too. If your child loves reading and would like to be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief enter this competition by simply writing the words “me please” in the comment box below.

Dr Hartley is a new author and is looking for children to review her fun story all about a pet thief and the kids who try to find out who has stolen the missing dogs…

When Annabelle and Harry’s beloved pet dog Milly goes missing they believe the local pet thief has struck again. They have a list of suspects and plenty of evidence but how can they prove who the thief is? Their mum works as a DNA scientist and has a laboratory in the garden. The children realise they can become “DNA Detectives” and secretly use the laboratory to analyse the evidence just like real life forensic scientists. Join them on their thrilling journey where they collect clues, analyse evidence and learn about DNA to solve this case and bring Milly home safely.

“I create stories and communicate them to children in a multi-sensory way including elements to stimulate listening, smell, taste, sight and sounds as well as their as their imagination! Where possible I include scientific experiments in my stories finding entertaining ways to explain difficult scientific concepts such as natural selection, inheritance and evolution to children.”

Dr Mandy Hartley

https://www.thelittlestorytellingcompany.co.uk/the-dna-detectives-to-catch-a-thief 

DNA Detectives book reviews

Dr Mandy Hartley and two of the reviews written by parents on Amazon

This competition to win a signed copy of The DNA Detectives to review is open until midnight on 1st February. Only open to UK residents.

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Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Introducing Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi!

 

Whizz Pop Bang mini scientist Camille

How adorable is this little scientist with her super cute Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi, complete with phosphorescent test tube! 😁

“Hello, your piece on Marie Curie in Issue 27 inspired our daughter Camille, 7, to create an edible homage for a school assignment to dress up fruit and vegetables. The test tube is made from phosphorescent silicone putty.
Thanks for a fantastic magazine, and keep up the good work.”
Alan Irving

Sensational scientist Marie Curie was featured in SKELETONS (issue 27) of Whizz Pop Bang, click here to buy this magazine from our online shop for just £3.75 inc. postage.

Issue 27 Marie Curie spread

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Royal Institution logo

Royal Institution Christmas lectures 2017

CHRISTMAS LECTURES 2017: The language of life

Later this month the amazing Professor Sophie Scott will deliver the 2017 CHRISTMAS LECTURES from the Royal Institution. Sophie’s a neuroscientist, stand-up comedian and an expert in laughter!  She’ll be unpacking all the amazing ways in which humans and animals communicate, and to celebrate we’re taking a peek at the most famous talking animals…

You can watch The Royal Institution Christmas lectures on BBC Four at 8.00pm on 26th, 27th and 28th December.

Royal Institute Christmas lectures Animal communicators

Royal Institute Christmas lectures famous animal communicators

 

Watch The Royal Institution Christmas lectures on BBC Four at 8.00pm on 26th, 27th and 28th December – let us know what you learnt from Sophie!

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school-gate-set-logo

School Gate SET: Giving scientists and engineers the opportunity to get back to work after a career break

Introducing the School Gate SET

For parents with a background in Science & Technology, talking to our children about how the world works; taking them to science museums; even doing a few backyard & kitchen experiments, all comes very naturally. Many primary school children, though, don’t get these experiences. Primary school teachers need to have a broad knowledge base, but often don’t have a STEM background and can find these subjects more challenging to teach. Even teachers with an interest in and enthusiasm for science and technology, find that the demands of the curriculum, with its focus on literacy and numeracy, leave little time for other subjects.

This is an area where schools can really benefit from parental expertise. We know of instances where parent governors have been given a responsibility for improving science provision across the school or are running after-school STEM/code clubs. We would like it to be much more common for parents with a STEM background to get involved in even more hands-on ways. To this end, we have founded the School Gate SET, an online community for parents who want to help with STEM in their children’s schools: sharing ideas and inspiring other to get involved.

The project is the brainchild of Kate Bellingham, STEM ambassador, former Tomorrow’s World presenter, and long-time champion for women’s opportunities in engineering. When her children were young and she was working part-time, she began to help out at their school in the usual ways: listening to readers and chaperoning school trips. Soon, though, she began to wonder if her skills could be put to better use. She began helping in maths lessons and, eventually, running an after-school STEM club. She really enjoyed seeing how excited and inspired the children were and, upon hearing one of the girls exclaim “That’s Emily’s Mum, she’s an Engineer!”, felt that she was also challenging some stereotypes along the way.

More recently, School Gate SET parents got involved with British Science Week: you can read about one of the activity days here. Our next “call to action” is for “Tomorrow’s Engineers Week” (November 2016) and we will be running some free training workshops for parent volunteers who would like to deliver a supporting activity. Please get in touch (or see here) for more information.

So, if you have a passion for STEM and would like to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers, have a chat with the Headteacher or Science co-ordinator at your children’s school about how you could begin to contribute. For activity ideas, check out our blog and Facebook page. If you have questions about how to get started, tweet or e-mail us and we’ll be happy to share our experiences. If you are a teacher who would like to encourage parental involvement, get in touch and we can provide a flier to send out to parents.

We look forward to hearing from you!
Helen

email: schoolgateset@gmail.com

Twitter: @SchoolGateSET

website: https://schoolgateset.blogspot.co.uk/

Notes about the funding for School Gate SET initiative:
The funding is from the Royal Academy of Engineering’s “Ingenious” program which supports novel ways of getting engineers involved in outreach activities. We are looking for engineers who are on a career break after having children (so, mostly women) and are in danger of being lost from the profession altogether. The funding is to run workshops on how to deliver an engineering activity to school-children, to (re)build confidence and to help engineers think about what they want to do next in their careers. We hope that this will help with the STEM “pipeline problem”, both by showing primary school children some “non-stereotypical” scientists and engineers as well as showing women they can get back into a STEM career after a break.
Our over-arching goal for the School Gate SET is to get more parents and carers from all STEM backgrounds helping out in schools and contributing ideas, advice and support to our online network.
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Whizz Pop Bang is for inquisitive girls and boys

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids_girl experimenting“I get very frustrated about the lack of women in science, having experienced sexism at university, such as comments about women being at the kitchen sink instead of in laboratories. I wanted to be part of the solution and try to change that attitude.”

Jenny Inglis

The team at Whizz Pop Bang have all experienced this attitude, which is why one of the key aims behind the magazine and the community we’re building is to grow confidence and provide role models for girls.

Whizz Pop Bang is a completely gender neutral children’s science magazine, because we strongly believe that science is for girls, just as much as it is for boys. This message needs to be communicated to not only to girls, but also to boys who need to see their female friends and peers as future scientists. We ensure every issue has strong female scientist role models, and content that appeals to all children.

The challenge is to reach out to families who don’t see science as part of their everyday lives. Our aim is to provide as many kids as possible with the opportunities to discover their natural curiosity and approach not just science, but all STEM subjects with an open mind. If we can help to achieve this at primary school, it will encourage more girls to see themselves as scientists of the future and continue their secondary education believing in themselves.

Read all about how Jenny started Whizz Pop Bang, and how she and the team have created a science magazine that inspires thousands of children to be curious:

https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2015/nov/20/science-magazine-founder-turns-her-kitchen-into-a-lab

 

 

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