four puppies playing

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine – virtual dog breeding game explained

Mini scientist Poppy explains how to play the virtual breeding game in the Purr-fect pets issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine.

Experiment with breeding different dogs together and see what colour the puppies are! Each dog has two copies of the coat colour gene. The black coat gene (B) is dominant and the brown coat gene (b) is recessive. This means that only puppies with bb genes will be brown, and all those with one or two B genes will be black.

What you do:

  1. Cut out the cards on page 19
  2. Choose a male dog and a female dog for breeding and lay their cards out on a table with the names facing up (you should have four cards)
  3. Randomly choose one card for each dog and record the puppy’s genes and coat colour in the table below
  4. Each litter produces four puppies so return the cards to the table, mix them up and repeat step 3 until you have recorded the genes and coat colours of four puppies
  5. Keep choosing different dogs to breed to see what colour their puppies will be

You should find:
Even though Daisy and Max are black, they can still produce brown puppies together, but Buddy and Bella will never produce brown puppies, even if they’re bred with a brown dog. Only Molly with Rocky will produce all brown puppies. Brown puppies are rarer than black so they cost more. This is why pet breeders often breed closely related animals with rare features together.

To play this game, buy the Purr-fect Pets issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine from our online shop for just £3.75 with free UK delivery.

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dinosaur-tracks-scotland

How does it feel to find a giant dino footprint? We talk to paleontologist Steve Brusatte to find out!

Did you hear about the huge dinosaur footprints discovered on the Scottish coast this week? We ask Steve Brusatte some very important questions about this awesome discovery…

Paleontologist Dr Steve Brusatte at the dinosaur footprint site on the Isle of Skye

Paleontologist Dr Steve Brusatte at the dinosaur footprint site on the Isle of Skye 

We’re lucky to have Steve on the Whizz Pop Bang boffin team (our panel of expert scientists who advise us on the latest scientific developments), so we asked him a few questions about the latest dinosaur print to be discovered on the Isle of Skye.

1. Are there words to describe just how exciting it feels to discover these tracks?

 It was a fantabulotastic feeling. I think that’s the best way I can try to put it into words! Because the moment of discovery is magical. When you find something that no human has ever seen before, something from hundreds of millions of years ago. It was actually one of my students who discovered these tracks. Davide Foffa is his name; he’s a PhD student, from Italy. I was very proud that my student found something so amazing!
davide foffa at footprint site

Davide Foffa, one of my students who actually discovered these tracks

2. Do you have a special dino discovery high five with your team?!
No! Although maybe I should invent one. Any ideas?
3.  If people want to go and visit the Isle of Skye can they see the foot print? Can they put their own foot inside the print?
Yes they can, although the tracks are located at a protected site, so they can’t be tampered with. If you go and see them, be careful not to damage them. They’ve lasted for 170 million years and we want them to last for a long time more. It is an amazing thing to put your foot inside a dinosaur track. It gives you a sense of just how big these dinosaurs were! The biggest tracks are 70 centimeters across, so about the size of a car tyre!

Want to know more about discovering dinosaurs? Order the Fossil Frenzy issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine and read all about how to find a dinosaur with Steve Brusatte! Visit our online shop to buy this issue for just £3.75 (free UK postage).

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids Fossil Frenzy cover
Whizz Pop Bang science magazine Issue 14 dinosaur hunting with paleontologist Steve Brusatte

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine issue 14: Fossil Frenzy

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Whizz POp Bang science magazine for kids edible poo_5

Blurghhh it’s edible poo!

We’ve been inundated with your photos of edible poo!!!! The PLOP-TASTIC poo issue has been the most popular issue of Whizz Pop Bang, proving (as if any parent or teacher needed proof) that kids really do love talking about poo!

WARNING! DO NOT look at these photos whilst eating, or if you’re easily offended by the sight of very realistic poo on a plate…

Intrigued about the ingredients for edible poo? Buy the PLOP-TASTIC poo issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine from our back issues shop and let the poo-themed fun begin!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine poo issue

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British Science Week 2018

How to celebrate British Science Week 2018!

British Science Week is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths for kids, families and schools everywhere. Get inspired and join millions of mini scientists experimenting and having fun learning about the awesome world of science.

This year British Science week is 9th to 18th March, so it’s time to get organized with your science activities!

We’ve got loads of ideas to bring science week to life in your school, so let’s get started. You will need your Whizz Pop Bang magazines (not a subscriber? Order back issues here at £3.75 per mag including delivery) and access to a colour photocopier.

Whizz Pop Bang scrapbook

Whizz Pop Bang share homework sheet

This idea came from primary science teachers Kathryn Horan and Toby Tyler. Every week a couple of the children in the class take home a Whizz Pop Bang magazine to share with their families.

For this you will need a scrapbook and a plastic wallet for each magazine. Prepare an instruction sheet to go with each one:

Welcome to our Whizz Pop Bang scrapbook!

There are no specific rules about what you should do with the magazine, you could…

  • Write about what you found particularly interesting
  • Draw or stick in photos of any experiments you did
  • Write in any additional research you have done
  • Write a review of the magazine
  • Read it together with older or younger siblings
  • Try out some of the experiments
  • Enter any competitions
  • Tweet what you have done to the magazine’s Twitter account, @whizzpopbangmag
  • Write and send a letter in to the letters page
  • Carry out some more research around the topics in the magazines

Whatever you do, we’d love to hear about it at school, so be sure to let us know or add something into the scrapbook. Have fun!

 

Inspirational scientists posters

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids Ibn al Haytham

Cover the classroom in posters of inspirational, sensational scientists! In every issue of Whizz Pop Bang there’s a double-page spread focusing on famous scientists who made history with their discoveries and inventions. Photocopy the spreads and pin up to inspire your pupils!

 

Interview with a real scientist…

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a nanotechnologist

Find out what real scientists do in their everyday jobs on our interview pages. We’ve interviewed over 30 scientists ready to inspire girls and boys to be our scientists of the future! To buy a back issue visit our back issues shop.

Issue 1: Becky Smith, Chocolate scientist

Issue 2: Karen Ladenheim, Robotics scientist, Stanford University

Issue 3: Lynn Whitfield, Bat ecologist

Issue 4: Dr Steve Brusatte, Palaeontologist, Edinburgh University

Issue 5: Rob Lambert, Antarctic explorer and polar scientist

Issue 6: Tim Peake, Astronaut

Issue 7: Susan Cheyne, Conservation biologist (orangutans)

Issue 8: Misha Lotto, young scientist, Blackawton Bees Project

Issue 9: Josie Campbell, Vet

Issue 10: Shane Cronin, Volcanologist (New Zealand)

Issue 11: Jennifer Andon, Entomologist

Issue 12: Dr Maddalena Bearsi, Marine biologist

Issue 13: Prof Robert Winston, Medical scientist, Imperial College

Issue 14: Sarah Shelley, Fossil hunter

Issue 15: Helen Czerski, Bubble scientist

Issue 16: Abbie Hutty, Mars Rover engineer

Issue 17: Lara Aknin, Psychology professor (gift-giving)

Issue 18: Emma Burke, Penguin aquarist

Issue 19: Ian Gilby, Primatologist, Tanzania

Issue 20: Caoimhe Doyle, Foley Artist, sound effect engineer

Issue 21: Amy Dejong, Food scientist, University of Wisconsin

Issue 22: Payton Barnwell, Nanotechnologist, Florida Polytechnic Uni

Issue 23: Dave Goulson, Bumblebee biologist

Issue 24: Huw James, Science adventurer

Issue 25: Alex Hildred, Maritime archaeologist

Issue 26: Cierra Martin, Seed guardian

Issue 27: Toby Gemmill, Orthopaedic vet

Issue 28: Dr Sheyna, Martian (sort of)

Issue 29: Richard Stammers, Visual effects artist

Issue 30: Andres Ruzo, Geothermal Scientist

Issue 31: Lisa Elser, Gem cutter

To buy a back issue (for just £3.75 inc delivery) visit our back issues shop.

10 Awesomely Amazing…

Whizz Pop Bang 10 Awesomely Amazing Unusual Harvests

Every issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine looks at 10 awesomely amazing things on that month’s topic. Looking at engineering as part of the year of engineering? Take a look at ENGINEERING EXTRAVAGANZA (issue 16) with 10 Awesomely Amazing bizarre buildings, including a toilet-shaped building in Korea! Studying the human body? Check out SPECTACULAR SKELETONS (issue 27) and the 10 Awesomely Amazing bionic body parts, from 3D printed prosthetic hands to ancient Egyptian artificial toes. Is your topic plants this term? Kids love reading about the 10 Awesomely Amazing harvests from around the world in our SUPER SEEDS (issue 26), did you know there are chillies that melt latex gloves?

 

Quiz Pop Bang

Whizz Pop Bang science quiz

All Whizz Pop Bang magazines are packed full of science puzzles and a quiz to test your pupil’s science knowledge. There are also word searches, jokes, riddles and brain teasers for every age and ability. Turn wet play into a festival of science fun and games!

Experiments!

There are hundreds of simple hands-on science experiments and activities in Whizz Pop Bang magazine, and for each one we outline what you need, what to do, and you will find making it ideal for primary school teachers who may not have a science background. Perfect for curious kids and teachers looking for simple science ideas! Check out our bulk discounts for schools here and celebrate British Science Week 2018 with a Whizz, Pop and a Bang!

 

GSS-logo-final-04

What is The Great Science Share?

Following on from British Science Week there are several events going on around the UK. Use these ideas for your Great Science Share; a national campaign to engage young people in sharing science with new audiences. 

PIONEERED IN MANCHESTER – MAKING A DIFFERENCE UK-WIDE

You can get involved as a School, STEM Educator, STEM Organisation and Business.

Features include:

The Great Science Teachmeet

The Business of Science Conference

The Great Science Share for Schools Campaign

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Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Whizz Pop Bang magazine competition to WIN a pack of eco straws!

Whizz Pop Bang Eco straw giveaway

Following on from our #LastStraw survey we’ve got some super cool eco straws to giveaway! Ditch the plastic – reusable and biodegradeable straws are the future!

The UK is easily the biggest user of plastic straws in Europe, with an estimated 8.5 billion thrown away each year, according to a study by Eunomia Research & Consulting. This compares with 4.8 billion in Germany, 3.2 billion in France, 2 billion in Italy and 1.1 billion in Denmark.

TO ENTER our giveaway, write the shocking number of plastic straws that are thrown away in the UK each year in the comment box below 👇🏽

Closing date is 10th March 2018. Thanks to Seraphina’s Kitchen, Little Cherry and Bambaw for supplying these awesome eco straws.

 

What are the alternatives to plastic straws?

We’ve rounded up some environmentally friendly choices of straw to have at home or to whip out of your bag next time you’re out and about!

Bamboo strawsBambaw_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

These are reusable, biodegradable drinking straws, made from whole bamboo, which is an easy to grow, sustainable crop. These eco-friendly straws can be used in hot and cold drinks and they don’t taste of anything. Available from Bambaw in packs of 12, and every pack comes with a cleaning brush. Enter our giveaway to win a pack of Bambaw straws!

Metal strawsSenhai_metal_straws

Senhai sell a set of eight stainless steel metal straws (available with a bend for those who want an angle in their straws!). They come in different colours, with a two cleaning brushes in a cloth bag, and are dishwasher proof.

Glass strawsStrawGrace_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

 

 

 

 

 

StrawGrace sell handmade, incredibly hardy glass straws that come in packs of five. These cool straws are BPA free, eco-friendly, dishwasher safe and shatterproof. Each packet comes with a year’s guarantee – this is the same glass that’s used in labs all over the world and in Pyrex dishes so it’s safe and strong.

Silicon straws

Seraphinas kitchen_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

Seraphina’s Kitchen make reusable coloured straws from silicone in two different sizes; one for juices and a larger one for smoothies. They’re all BPA free, lead and phthalates free and you can clean them with the brush that comes with each pack, or put them in the dishwasher. Enter our giveaway to win a pack of Seraphina’s silicone straws!

Paper straws

little cherry paper straws

If you’re after colourful fun paper straws for your child’s party check out Little Cherry Eco Party Supplies, so many styles, designs and colours to choose from! This is most definitely your one-stop shop for all things party ware, get your party rocking eco style with all their environmentally-friendly tableware. Enter our giveaway to win a pack of Little Cherry paper straws!

 

Vegware PLA Straws

vegware-straws

How about a bioplastic alternative?  Vegware PLA Straws are made from corn that would otherwise go to waste. Its proper name is polylactic acid (PLA) and it’s used by Vegware to manufacture drinking straws, as well as other utensils and coffee cups. While plastic straws take between 100 and 1,000 years to break down in landfill, conventional enzyme action is enough to decompose PLA straws in under 12 weeks, so they can go in your bin with the rest of your food waste.

TO ENTER our giveaway, write the shocking number of plastic straws that are thrown away in the UK each year in the comment box below 👇🏽

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Seraphinas kitchen_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

#LastStraw What do Whizz Pop Bang readers think?

Evening Standard Last Straw campaign

After reading about the London Evening Standard’s excellent #LastStraw campaign to encourage cafés and restaurants to stop giving out plastic straws, we thought it would be interesting to find out what children thought about receiving their drinks with straws.

Whizz Pop Bang is an awesome science magazine for inquisitive six to twelve-year-olds, so our readers and the children of our online fans were perfectly placed to answer a few questions about how they like to drink their drinks. This was obviously a subject that kids felt strongly about as we received over 1,600 responses. Here’s what we discovered…

Q1. Would you rather have a paper straw or no straw?

Would you rather have a paper straw or no straw?

The results are close with just over half (54%) of the children who answered our survey saying, yes, they would rather have a paper straw than no straw at all, showing that there’s still a fair amount of desire for paper straws over no straws.

Q2. If you like having a straw in your drink, please tell us why…

If you like having a straw in your drink please tell us why

What are the reasons people like having straws? There are many. Kids like to schlurp their drinks with a straw, blow bubbles and even make things with a straw (future engineers!). They’re certainly useful when you’re very young and the glass is too tall, or the ice is making the glass too cold to hold. Some just like sipping and stirring, and making their drink last longer. Any dentist will tell us it’s better for your teeth if you drink through a straw, and there are people who need to use a straw for medical or behavioural conditions such as autism. The overriding result however, with just over 30%, is that people like a straw because it’s a treat when they go out.

Q3. If you were given a drink without a straw, would you ask for one?

If you were given a drink without a straw would you ask for one

The results here are interesting, with only 27% of respondents saying that they would proactively ask for a straw if their drink didn’t come with one. This means that the majority of children wouldn’t mind if establishments simply changed their policies to stop routinely providing straws in drinks. This could cut down straw use by a whopping 73%. And the cost savings from that could be put towards purchasing more environmentally friendly straws for the children who would like them.

Straws: the statistics

The UK is easily the biggest user of plastic straws in Europe, with an estimated 8.5 billion thrown away each year, according to a study by Eunomia Research & Consulting. This compares with 4.8 billion in Germany, 3.2 billion in France, 2 billion in Italy and 1.1 billion in Denmark.

Several small towns and villages around Britain have declared themselves plastic straw-free, but an initiative in the capital could act as a catalyst for the whole nation.

Evening Standard, Monday 15th January

Time to act everyone! As parents, grandparents and carers who take children out for drinks, we are the ones who need to be making the decisions and paving the way. Together we need to educate our children and teach them to understand why we need to find alternatives to many types of plastic, not just straws. We also need to use our buying power and our voices to tell cafés and restaurants what we think – simply make a point of requesting no plastic straws when you place your drinks order and explain why.

What are the alternatives to plastic straws?

We’ve rounded up some environmentally friendly choices of straw to have at home or to whip out of your bag next time you’re out and about!

Bamboo strawsBambaw_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

These are reusable, biodegradable drinking straws, made from whole bamboo, which is an easy to grow, sustainable crop. These eco-friendly straws can be used in hot and cold drinks and they don’t taste of anything. Available from Bambaw in packs of 12, and every pack comes with a cleaning brush.

Metal strawsSenhai_metal_straws

Senhai sell a set of eight stainless steel metal straws (available with a bend for those who want an angle in their straws!). They come in different colours, with a two cleaning brushes in a cloth bag, and are dishwasher proof.

Glass strawsStrawGrace_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

 

 

 

 

 

StrawGrace sell handmade, incredibly hardy glass straws that come in packs of five. These cool straws are BPA free, eco-friendly, dishwasher safe and shatterproof. Each packet comes with a year’s guarantee – this is the same glass that’s used in labs all over the world and in Pyrex dishes so it’s safe and strong.

Silicon straws

Seraphinas kitchen_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

Seraphina’s Kitchen make reusable coloured straws from silicone in two different sizes; one for juices and a larger one for smoothies. They’re all BPA free, lead and phthalates free and you can clean them with the brush that comes with each pack, or put them in the dishwasher. A pack of 6 silicone straws is £12.47 from Buy Me Once

Paper straws

Kikkerland_ecofriendly_alternatives_to_plastic_straws

Kikkerland make loads of fun coloured and patterned paper straws, which makes a cheap and planet-friendly alternative to plastic straws at a party. The inks are soy based and food safe, the paper is biodegradable and coated with beeswax.

Vegware PLA Straws

vegware-straws

How about a bioplastic alternative?  Vegware PLA Straws are made from corn that would otherwise go to waste. Its proper name is polylactic acid (PLA) and it’s used by Vegware to manufacture drinking straws, as well as other utensils and coffee cups. While plastic straws take between 100 and 1,000 years to break down in landfill, conventional enzyme action is enough to decompose PLA straws in under 12 weeks, so they can go in your bin with the rest of your food waste.

 

In summary

The results of our survey show that whilst the majority of children feel okay about not using straws at all, there’s still a desire for straws, and hence a need for alternatives to plastic straws. Whether it’s as a treat in a special drink or because of less frivolous reasons such as age or health, there is a demand for a way to drink a drink without having to lift or touch the cup or glass.

The good news is that far fewer straws are needed in the first place, because the vast majority of children wouldn’t request a straw if their drink didn’t have one. That means savings for cafés and restaurants and more importantly, savings for the environment.

Paper straws might make the most sense in cafés because they’re cheap and hygienic. Restaurants and bars might go for more durable straws such as glass or metal, depending on their budgets and style preference. Silicone, bamboo, metal and paper straws are ideal for home use, birthday parties and people who want to take them out and about as an alternative to plastic straws.

Thank you to everyone who answered the questions in our survey. We’re off to add some eco-friendly straws to our shopping list – slurp!

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Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Plastic wrap – finding a solution

Thank you to all our concerned subscribers who have been in touch about the use of plastic wrap to package Whizz Pop Bang magazines.

Whilst plastic wrap has lots of advantages – it keeps the magazines dry, is lightweight and affordable and protects the magazines from the rigours of the postal system, we’re very aware that it’s not an eco-friendly solution. Although plastic wrap can be recycled along with plastic bags, that’s becoming harder to do since a lot of supermarkets have now sadly removed their plastic bag recycling facilities.

The team at Whizz Pop Bang are actively seeking a more environmentally friendly alternative, but sadly this is not as straightforward as it ought to be. We have to consider the logistics – the added weight and bulk of envelopes and therefore the extra fuel used to transport them. We also have to consider the chemicals used in production of any material, as well as the extra cost implications (we don’t charge for postage and packing, which helps to make the price of a subscription affordable).

This issue is a real concern and we’ll let our subscribers know as soon as we’ve found an eco-friendly solution. In the meantime, please recycle your plastic wrap or repurpose it as best you can. To find your nearest plastic wrap recycling point, use this online tool: https://www.recyclenow.com/local-recycling

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January’s book competition

The DNA Detectives: Catch a Thief

 

This month we have a slightly different book competition for kids to enter, to help launch a brand new storybook ‘The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief’ written by Dr Mandy Hartley. Whilst there are lots of excellent reviews for this book, they are written by parents and Mandy would love to hear what children think too. If your child loves reading and would like to be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief enter this competition by simply writing the words “me please” in the comment box below.

Dr Hartley is a new author and is looking for children to review her fun story all about a pet thief and the kids who try to find out who has stolen the missing dogs…

When Annabelle and Harry’s beloved pet dog Milly goes missing they believe the local pet thief has struck again. They have a list of suspects and plenty of evidence but how can they prove who the thief is? Their mum works as a DNA scientist and has a laboratory in the garden. The children realise they can become “DNA Detectives” and secretly use the laboratory to analyse the evidence just like real life forensic scientists. Join them on their thrilling journey where they collect clues, analyse evidence and learn about DNA to solve this case and bring Milly home safely.

“I create stories and communicate them to children in a multi-sensory way including elements to stimulate listening, smell, taste, sight and sounds as well as their as their imagination! Where possible I include scientific experiments in my stories finding entertaining ways to explain difficult scientific concepts such as natural selection, inheritance and evolution to children.”

Dr Mandy Hartley

https://www.thelittlestorytellingcompany.co.uk/the-dna-detectives-to-catch-a-thief 

DNA Detectives book reviews

Dr Mandy Hartley and two of the reviews written by parents on Amazon

This competition to win a signed copy of The DNA Detectives to review is open until midnight on 1st February. Only open to UK residents.

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Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Introducing Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi!

 

Whizz Pop Bang mini scientist Camille

How adorable is this little scientist with her super cute Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi, complete with phosphorescent test tube! 😁

“Hello, your piece on Marie Curie in Issue 27 inspired our daughter Camille, 7, to create an edible homage for a school assignment to dress up fruit and vegetables. The test tube is made from phosphorescent silicone putty.
Thanks for a fantastic magazine, and keep up the good work.”
Alan Irving

Sensational scientist Marie Curie was featured in SKELETONS (issue 27) of Whizz Pop Bang, click here to buy this magazine from our online shop for just £3.75 inc. postage.

Issue 27 Marie Curie spread

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Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Article on independent children’s magazines in The i Paper

Great article in The i Paper yesterday about the rise of independent children’s magazines, with a lovely write-up for Whizz Pop Bang, Dot, Scoop and Anorak 😊

It’s so good to see we all have a common goal; to let kids be kids and to learn about the world through reading, play and of course experimenting! Yes there’s a place for screens, but it’s important to get a healthy balance and we’re proud to say we’re providing that for children and their families around the world.

If you’d like to subscribe to Whizz Pop Bang for a Christmas present you’ve still got time! Order by midnight on Sunday 17th December: whizzpopbang.com/xmas

Whizz Pop Bang in The i Paper

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