whizz pop bang science magazine paper straw planes

Geometric paper straw planes!

How do you make a triangle fly? Will a square take to the air? Create your own paper straw flying machines and put them to the test with the SKY HIGH SCIENCE issue of Whizz Pop Bang! You’ll find everything you need inside issue 36 of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine, order a copy for just £3.75 with FREE UK delivery here.

Packed full of outdoor science activities for girls and boys over the summer holidays – ditch the screens and find out how planes fly!

 

0 replies

Take off this summer with our Sky High Science issue!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Sky high science

Wouldn’t it be amazing to fly like a bird? Or how do you fancy fluttering like a butterfly, or even soaring like a snake?! There are all sorts of flying phenomena to discover this issue. Have a go at making your own stunt plane, investigating different designs of straw planes and testing aerofoils. We interview Palaeontologist Liz Martin-Silverstone to ask her how on earth the giant pterosaurs were able to fly, plus we find out how drones work, and answer the question on lots of people’s minds… just how do planes fly???

Buy this issue here and fill your summer holidays with awesome science fun!! 🦋 ✈ 🚁

0 replies
Agnes Arber photo in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

Scientists from history

Each month we celebrate a sensational scientist from history; an eminent figure in the creation, invention or discovery of a scientific breakthrough. How many famous scientists can you name? How many of those are women? Female scientists were often forgotten or unknown, simply because they were women. And yet their work was instrumental in discovering hugely important scientific breakthroughs.

Inside Whizz Pop Bang magazine your kids will discover the historic world of science; who invented computers, who discovered the milky way and who is responsible for how we forecast the weather. We tell the story of these fascinating scientists, both male and female, and how they came to discover incredible things.

A few examples of the less well-known women we’ve featured: Lise Meitner, whose work led to the discovery of nuclear fission, astronomer Caroline Herschel and Agnes Arber, botanist and early ambassador in helping the world to recognize the amazing talent of women in science. Read the full list of sensational scientists below.

The story of Agnes Arber in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

List of the sensational scientists featured in Whizz Pop Bang magazine:

Issue 1: Mary Anning

Issue 2: Charles Darwin

Issue 3: Maria Telkes

Issue 4: Leonardo da Vinci

Issue 5: Lise Meitner

Issue 6: Louis Pasteur

Issue 7: Rosalind Franklin

Issue 8: Antoine Lavoisier

Issue 9: Mary Somerville

Issue 10: Charles Lyell

Issue 11: Caroline Herschel

Issue 12: Jacques Cousteau

Issue 13: Grace Hopper

Issue 14: Roy Chapman Andrews

Issue 15: William Henry Perkin

Issue 16: Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Issue 17: Florence Nightingale

Issue 18: Albert Einstein

Issue 19: Gregor Mendel

Issue 20: Rachel Carson

Issue 21: Ibn al Haytham

Issue 22: Richard Feynman

Issue 23: Agnes Arber

Issue 24: Alfred Wegener

Issue 25: Jeanne Villepreux-Power

Issue 26: George de Mestral, velcro

Issue 27: Marie Curie

Issue 28: Nicolaus Copernicus

Issue 29: Hedy Lamarr

Issue 30: Archimedes

Issue 31: Anselmus De Boot

Issue 32: Joseph Bazalgette

Issue 33: Charles Darwin

Issue 34: Michael Faraday

Issue 35: Gerty Cori

To buy a back issue for just £3.75 (with free UK delivery!) visit our shop.

0 replies
Nikita Hari photo

Whizz Pop Bang interviews with science heroes!

Whizz Pop Bang Interview with Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari

Each month we interview a SCIENCE HERO to find out what real scientists do in their jobs. This is where we ensure we have a real mix of male and female scientists to inspire girls and boys, and particularly showcase women in STEM roles. Breaking down gender stereotypes is an important part of Whizz Pop Bang magazine as we strive for a future of equality.

Many of the scientists we interview are happy to be contacted by readers who have their own questions, a great opportunity to chat to real scientists! We love this tweet from Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari who’s passionate about inspiring kids into science, especially girls…

Inspiring tweet from Nikita Hari electrical engineer

 

Are your kids super curious, always asking questions and exploring new ideas? Help them to nurture their natural curiosity with Whizz Pop Bang! Here’s a list of the 35 scientists we’ve interviewed to date:

Issue 1: Beccy Smith, Chocolate scientist

Issue 2: Karen Ladenheim, Robotics scientist, Stanford University

Issue 3: Lynn Whitfield, Bat ecologist

Issue 4: Dr Steve Brusatte, Palaeontologist, Edinburgh University

Issue 5: Rob Lambert, Antarctic explorer and polar scientist

Issue 6: Tim Peake, Astronaut

Issue 7: Susan Cheyne, Conservation biologist (orangutans)

Issue 8: Misha Lotto, young scientist, Blackawton Bees Project

Issue 9: Josie Campbell, Vet

Issue 10: Shane Cronin, Volcanologist (New Zealand)

Issue 11: Jennifer Andon, Entomologist

Issue 12: Dr Maddalena Bearsi, Marine biologist

Issue 13: Prof Robert Winston, Medical scientist, Imperial College

Issue 14: Sarah Shelley, Fossil hunter

Issue 15: Helen Czerski, Bubble scientist

Issue 16: Abbie Hutty, Mars Rover engineer

Issue 17: Lara Aknin, Psychology professor (gift-giving)

Issue 18: Emma Burke, Penguin aquarist

Issue 19: Ian Gilby, Primatologist, Tanzania

Issue 20: Caoimhe Doyle, Foley Artist, sound effect engineer

Issue 21: Amy Dejong, Food scientist, University of Wisconsin

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a nanotechnologist

Issue 22: Payton Barnwell, Nanotechnologist, Florida Polytechnic Uni

Issue 23: Dave Goulson, Bumblebee biologist

Issue 24: Huw James, Science adventurer

Issue 25: Alex Hildred, Maritime archaeologist

Issue 26: Cierra Martin, Seed guardian

Issue 27: Toby Gemmill, Orthopaedic vet

Issue 28: Dr Sheyna, Martian (sort of!)

Issue 29: Richard Stammers, Visual effects artist

Issue 30: Andres Ruzo, Geothermal Scientist

Issue 31: Lisa Elser, Gem cutter

Issue 32: Pratap Pullammanappallil, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida, USA 

Issue 33: Dr Nicola Rooney, Research Fellow in the Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group at the University of Bristol

Issue 34: Nikita Hari, Electrical Engineer

Issue 35: Barry Drust, Professor of Exercise Physiology

Whizz Pop Bang magazine has helped to inspire lots of girls and boys to want to be scientists when they grow up! To buy a back issue (for just £3.75 inc UK delivery) visit our back issues shop or you can sign up for monthly magazines by post – simply subscribe online.

0 replies
four puppies playing

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine – virtual dog breeding game explained

Mini scientist Poppy explains how to play the virtual breeding game in the Purr-fect pets issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine.

Experiment with breeding different dogs together and see what colour the puppies are! Each dog has two copies of the coat colour gene. The black coat gene (B) is dominant and the brown coat gene (b) is recessive. This means that only puppies with bb genes will be brown, and all those with one or two B genes will be black.

What you do:

  1. Cut out the cards on page 19
  2. Choose a male dog and a female dog for breeding and lay their cards out on a table with the names facing up (you should have four cards)
  3. Randomly choose one card for each dog and record the puppy’s genes and coat colour in the table below
  4. Each litter produces four puppies so return the cards to the table, mix them up and repeat step 3 until you have recorded the genes and coat colours of four puppies
  5. Keep choosing different dogs to breed to see what colour their puppies will be

You should find:
Even though Daisy and Max are black, they can still produce brown puppies together, but Buddy and Bella will never produce brown puppies, even if they’re bred with a brown dog. Only Molly with Rocky will produce all brown puppies. Brown puppies are rarer than black so they cost more. This is why pet breeders often breed closely related animals with rare features together.

To play this game, buy the Purr-fect Pets issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine from our online shop for just £3.75 with free UK delivery.

0 replies
Whizz POp Bang science magazine for kids edible poo_5

Blurghhh it’s edible poo!

We’ve been inundated with your photos of edible poo!!!! The PLOP-TASTIC poo issue has been the most popular issue of Whizz Pop Bang, proving (as if any parent or teacher needed proof) that kids really do love talking about poo!

WARNING! DO NOT look at these photos whilst eating, or if you’re easily offended by the sight of very realistic poo on a plate…

Intrigued about the ingredients for edible poo? Buy the PLOP-TASTIC poo issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine from our back issues shop and let the poo-themed fun begin!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine poo issue

0 replies
Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Article on independent children’s magazines in The i Paper

Great article in The i Paper yesterday about the rise of independent children’s magazines, with a lovely write-up for Whizz Pop Bang, Dot, Scoop and Anorak 😊

It’s so good to see we all have a common goal; to let kids be kids and to learn about the world through reading, play and of course experimenting! Yes there’s a place for screens, but it’s important to get a healthy balance and we’re proud to say we’re providing that for children and their families around the world.

If you’d like to subscribe to Whizz Pop Bang for a Christmas present you’ve still got time! Order by midnight on Sunday 17th December: whizzpopbang.com/xmas

Whizz Pop Bang in The i Paper

0 replies