Whizz Pop Bang Blog
butterfly garden kit

Minibeast photography competition

The results are in from our minibeast competition (issue 11, June) and we have five winners to announce!

Firstly we want to say thank you to all of you who entered. We had over 75 entries of awesome minibeast photos. We now have spiders, bees, butterflies, caterpillars, beetles, slugs, ladybirds, snails, dragonflies, centipedes and moths all crawling around on the Whizz Pop Bang office wall 🙂

Without further ado here are our lucky winners and their prize-winning photos…

Isla Gibbs, age 10:

Whizz Pop Bang minibeast competition winner Isla

James Grant, age 7:

Whizz Pop Bang minibeast competition winner

Khadeejah Hussain, age 5:

Whizz Pop Bang minibeast competition winner

Megan Whitfield, age 10:

Whizz Pop Bang minibeast competition winner

Pippa Pang, age 6:

Whizz Pop Bang minibeast competition winner

Congratulations to our five winners, your butterfly garden kits are on the way! If you didn’t win and you’d really like a butterfly garden kit they are available from insectlore.co.uk

Enjoy the sunshine and the minibeasts in your garden or park, and remember to handle all minibeasts very carefully and be aware that some might sting.

Whizz Pop Bang at The Guardian Small Business Showcase Awards

The Guardian Small Business Showcase Awards

On Thursday 7th July we took Whizz Pop Bang to London for the Guardian Small Business Showcase Awards evening, as finalists in the home business innovation category for 2016. The event was held upstairs at The Lighterman Bar in London’s redeveloped King Cross area, a fitting venue for start-ups and new businesses to be celebrating growth and ingenuity. As soon as we arrived we could feel the energy and buzzing enthusiasm from the entrepreneurs and small business owners selected from thousands, down to just 18 businesses across six categories.

Whizz Pop Bang was a finalist in the home business innovation category along with Longcroft Luxury Cat Hotel and Spice Kitchen.

The winner that night was Longcroft, who after six years in business now have franchises across the UK for cat-lovers wanting to work from home. Congratulations to the team at Longcroft, we wish you every success and it was great to meet you.

Despite not winning, we are so proud to have been shortlisted as finalists in less than a year of setting up Whizz Pop Bang. So, here’s to the future of awesomely amazing science for kids!

https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/gallery/2016/jul/08/guardian-small-business-showcase-awards-2016-in-pictures

 

Whizz Pop Bang round logo

Reviews for Whizz Pop Bang

Whizz Pop Bang back copies set

“My 6 year old was very happy to get his first copy today. All thoughts of playing Lego games on the tablet have been forgotten whilst he tells me all about seahorses” 
Clair Sperring Cartwright

“Just received our first copy. The boys love it! Proper science, great information and laid out in a really child friendly, fun way”
Emma Veitch 

“What a fabulous discovery: a bright, new, engaging magazine with a sense of humour that appeals to children and is packed with fun science facts and activities. I love it!”
Jules PottlePrimary Science Teacher of the Year Awrded by the Primary Science Teaching Trust

“So we have an egg shell dissolving in a Jar on the worktop and a row of cups with eggs being coloured in the fridge. The “yay fizz pop bang is here!” And the instant opening and reading are worth every penny. My son is six and read us every article over the next week”
Naomi Forster

“My 10 year old loves this magazine and the latest email giving a list of supplies for the forthcoming issues experiments is a fantastic idea. Thanks very much!”
Su Garbutt

@whizzpopbangmag has created a real buzz in my classroom – rota of kids wanting to take it home to share”
Paul Tyler, Primary Science Teacher

“Love this magazine. We received our 2nd issue today and it was whisked away by my 9 year. Whole family is enjoying this. Thank you Whizz Pop Bang!”
Rebecca Stephens 

 

Try this science experiment at home

What makes the best bubbles? Try this experiment and see!

Whizz Pop Bang what makes the best bubbles

Would you like to know what makes the best bubbles?

 

Make a base mixture of water mixed with washing up liquid. If you don’t already have one, you can make a bubble wand using a pipe cleaner. Experiment with blowing bubbles, and then try adding sugar, baking powder, corn syrup or glycerin to your mixture, one at a time. Test how each ingredient changes the surface tension and affects the bubbles.

Have you ever wondered why bubbles form in soapy water but not in ordinary water? The answer is surface tension. The surface tension of water is too strong for bubbles to last – the water molecules pull each other together and the bubbles quickly burst. When water is mixed with soap, the surface tension becomes weaker and the liquid can be ‘stretched’ more, allowing bubbles to form.

 

Whizz Pop Bang is for inquisitive girls and boys

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids_girl experimenting“I get very frustrated about the lack of women in science, having experienced sexism at university, such as comments about women being at the kitchen sink instead of in laboratories. I wanted to be part of the solution and try to change that attitude.”

Jenny Inglis

The team at Whizz Pop Bang have all experienced this attitude, which is why one of the key aims behind the magazine and the community we’re building is to grow confidence and provide role models for girls.

Whizz Pop Bang is a completely gender neutral children’s science magazine, because we strongly believe that science is for girls, just as much as it is for boys. This message needs to be communicated to not only to girls, but also to boys who need to see their female friends and peers as future scientists. We ensure every issue has strong female scientist role models, and content that appeals to all children.

The challenge is to reach out to families who don’t see science as part of their everyday lives. Our aim is to provide as many kids as possible with the opportunities to discover their natural curiosity and approach not just science, but all STEM subjects with an open mind. If we can help to achieve this at primary school, it will encourage more girls to see themselves as scientists of the future and continue their secondary education believing in themselves.

Read all about how Jenny started Whizz Pop Bang, and how she and the team have created a science magazine that inspires thousands of children to be curious:

https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2015/nov/20/science-magazine-founder-turns-her-kitchen-into-a-lab

 

 

Kids are you ready to taste the foods of the future?

Eating Foods Of The Future At Cheltenham Science Festival 2016

Whizz Pop Bang introduced eating insects (entomophagy) to the Cheltenham Science Festival; inviting kids and their families to try ‘foods of the future’. These are just some of the kids who tried pasta and flapjacks made with crickets, we think the smiles say it all!

In issue 7 of Whizz Pop Bang we introduced our readers to the concept of eating grubs as a sustainable source of protein. Now as a forward-thinking kids science magazine we’re all about looking into the future 🙂 So we got in touch with a company in Thailand, called Bugsolutely, who make pasta using 20% cricket flour mixed with 80% wheat flour, and asked them if they’d send us some boxes to try. Three weeks later a large box arrived full of pasta ready for our trials. We sent out a newsletter inviting Whizz Pop Bang subscribers to take part, and within minutes we were inundated with families wanting to taste cricket pasta! So we set up individual trials, and took the pasta to Cheltenham Science Festival to find out firsthand what the kids thought.

And the results?

Whizz Pop Bang Science Magazine foods of the future

In the style of Innocence smoothies, we asked people to vote with their rubbish. So we had a ‘YES! I’d definitely buy this’ bin, and a ‘NO! It’s not my cup of tea’ bin. The results speak for themselves, it’s a resounding YES please to buying foods made with insects in the UK!

The double page spread in February’s issue of our magazine, introducing the idea of eating grubs:

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids eating insects

Feed the World – By the year 2050 there will be over 9 billion people living on Planet Earth. With all these extra mouths to feed, there is a real risk of a global food crisis developing. Farm animals are responsible for producing almost a third of the greenhouse gasses that are contributing to global warming. They also need lots of land and drink lots of water, so we need a more sustainable solution.

“The way we farm our food is going to have to change. We can’t keep farming like we do today, or we won’t be able to produce enough food and look after our environment at the same time.” Dr Sarah Beynon, an insect expert and farmer.

Insects – the taste of the future Like it or not, we are all going to have to make changes to the way we eat in the future, and scientists like Dr Beynon think that insects will soon become a normal part of our diet.

 

 

Finished seed trays

5, 4, 3, 2, 1… Plant off!

I was just a little bit excited (*practically rocketing along the country roads*) to be invited along to my kids’ lovely local village school, Meysey Hampton C of E Primary School, to help sew their space rocket seeds yesterday. If you haven’t heard about this project, here’s what it’s all about…