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Summer science ideas whatever the weather!

School’s officially out for the summer!!! WHOOOPEEEEE! Get ready for summer science fun with Whizz Pop Bang and our awesome experiments to do in the garden, at the beach, in the park or at the kitchen table when the skies are black…

Science outside:
☀️ Make a solar oven and bake cookies in the garden
☀️ Forensic science blood spatter test
☀️ Minibeast habitats
☀️ Butterfly banquet
☀️ Lay a pitfall trap
☀️ Make your own pooter (a special pot for collecting insects)

In the dark:
⭐️ Hold your own stargazing party
🌙 Night time safari

At the beach:
🐚 Take the super strong sand challenge
🐚 Sandcastle secrets for Whizz Pop Bang scientists!
🐚 Sand ripples in a bowl
🐚 Panning for gold
🐚 Shake it up!

Wet weather science:
☔️ Make a snoop-o-scope
☔️ Take your own finger prints
☔️ Make your own pond skater
☔️ Fireworks on a plate
☔️ Take the paper clip challenge
☔️ Penny drop
☔️ Whooshing pepper
☔️ Make an ocean in a bottle
☔️ Make a water-powered boat
☔️ Make an octopus

Order our summer science bundle here https://whizzpopbang.com/shop/product/899265457

Remember to post up your pics! #summerscience

Try this science experiment at home

What makes the best bubbles? Try this experiment and see!

Whizz Pop Bang what makes the best bubbles

Would you like to know what makes the best bubbles?

 

Make a base mixture of water mixed with washing up liquid. If you don’t already have one, you can make a bubble wand using a pipe cleaner. Experiment with blowing bubbles, and then try adding sugar, baking powder, corn syrup or glycerin to your mixture, one at a time. Test how each ingredient changes the surface tension and affects the bubbles.

Have you ever wondered why bubbles form in soapy water but not in ordinary water? The answer is surface tension. The surface tension of water is too strong for bubbles to last – the water molecules pull each other together and the bubbles quickly burst. When water is mixed with soap, the surface tension becomes weaker and the liquid can be ‘stretched’ more, allowing bubbles to form.