Whizz Pop Bang is a science magazine for 6-11 year olds. Covering the topics taught at school as part of the British Science Curriculum, the magazine helps to further children’s understanding of key areas within science. The key areas of learning science in Key Stage 1 and 2 are: Friction, gravity, forces etc.

Whizz Pop Bang chromatography flowers

FLOWER POWER chromatography competition entries and winners!

In our FLOWER POWER issue Whizz Pop Bang readers learnt how to use the power of science to make these gorgeously frilly flowers. Paper chromatography is a neat little science trick that you can use to easily separate the different coloured inks out of felt tip pens.

Readers sent in their photos to enter the flower power competition to win a nature keeper tree diary set. As you’ll appreciate it was a tough job choosing just three winners – you should all be winners for producing these colourful creations! However, there could only be three winners and here they are:

Lula Brown, Aged 9
Isabel Soden, Aged 8
Jasper Warner, Aged 5
Congratulations, you have all won a Learning Resources Nature Keeper and Tree Diary Set perfect for summer science in the garden! Have a browse through all the entries for the competition, so many beautiful flowers and budding young scientists… 🌸 💐 🌼

Seven-year-old Whizz Pop Bang reader writes to her local MP about air pollution

Each month Whizz Pop Bang magazine goes in depth to take a closer look at science in the news. In issue 22, SMALL WONDER Zooming in on tiny science the in-depth feature is all about air pollution and the tiny particles that can cause severe health issues.

We feature a guide to help kids take action to reduce air pollution in their area, and number one on that list is write to your MP to let them know about your concerns:

Whizz Pop Bang 6 things you can do to help reduce air pollution

Whizz Pop Bang feature: Six things you can do to help reduce air pollution in your area

 

Whizz Pop Bang reader Evie did just that, writing an excellent letter to her local MP Jon Crudas, outlining not just pollution issues but also highlighting issues with her local park, and the need for free school meals…

Whizz Pop Bang subscriber letter to MP

Letter to Jon Crudas, written by seven year old Evie after reading a feature in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

Whizz Pop Bang child posting letter to MP

Evie posting her letter, full of hope and anticipation!

After a few patient weeks of waiting Evie receives a reply! Such a wonderful look of pride and achievement on Evie’s face, evidence that writing to your local MP really does work! Mr Crudas explains he has sent a copy of her letter to Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London, and he’s also looking into what has happened to the playground equipment. Well done Evie, we’re super impressed with your passion and determination to make a difference.

Whizz Pop Bang reader with the handwritten reply from her local MP

A very proud little girl with her hand written reply from her local MP who was so impressed with her letter he has sent a copy to Sadiq Khan.

Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Now in stock > > > the Whizz Pop Bang binder!

Keep all your Whizz Pop Bang science magazines neat and tidy with our brand new binders. Easy to use, holds 12 magazines, and provides a complete folder of resources for science and topic homework. Designed by Clive Goodyer, the awesome Whizz Pop Bang illustrator!

Order yours from our online shop: whizzpopbang.com/shop and get those magazines in order 🙂

 

See inside science book review

Winning science book review by Alfie, age 5

 

Whizz Pop Bang science news for kids

A few months ago we ran a competition to win all six of the science books shortlisted for the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize 2016 including two by our awesomely amazing Whizz Pop Bang writers Isabel Thomas and Dan Green 🙂

Without further ado here’s the winning review by Alfie, age 5. Well done to Alfie for being a super mini scientist AND being so passionate about science. Enjoy those books!

See inside science book review

See Inside Science by Usborne Books

  “It’s about the human body, cells, animals, plants, the beginning of the universe, space, energy and electricity, elements and the periodic table, putting things together, Protons, Neutrons, Electrons and Quarks inside an Atom and the final one, see into the future.
  I’ve learnt that there are all sorts of elements, 92 elements that aren’t made in a lab, if you’re counting the ones in the lab there’s 118, but loads of people forget about Dutrium, so there’s 119.  Dutrium is a gas that Brown Dwarfs fuse.  
  I like it because I like science.  I love science actually.  It’s got atoms in it.  I like it that it has flaps.  It’s easy to understand. 
It’s fun, fun, fun, fun, fun.”
Review by Alfie Jack Pile, age 5
Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids magnifying glass and hair

AWESOME SCIENCE FOR BUDDING YOUNG SCIENTISTS!

Whizz Pop Bang experimenting with nanotubes

A Whizz Pop Bang subscriber experimenting with nanotubes to see how carbon nanotubes behave

This month we zoom in on tiny science!

Imagine what it would be like to shrink to the size of a dot! This issue we’re doing exactly that to see how things work on a minuscule scale. 

This month we’ve got loads of supercool experiments and activities to turn your mini scientists into nano-scientists! Discover how a watch works, find out all about teeny tiny pygmy marmosets and find out what it’s like to be a nanotechnologist. Meet sensational scientist Richard Feynman, who encouraged scientists to “think small”. Plus, our 10 Awesomely Amazing tiny things that live on your body, blurghhh!

As always, happy experimenting 🙂

From the WPB team x

What’s on for February half term at the UK’s top science museums

Whizz Pop Bang January issue SNOWBALL SCIENCE!

whizz-pop-bang-science-magazine-for-kids-snow-science

Happy New Year Whizz Pop Bang readers!

Oh how we love January with wet hats, missing gloves and runny noses. Whether it’s snowing outside or not, snow time like the present to start investigating the winter wonderland! With science magazine Whizz Pop Bang your kids can simulate a snowball flightinvestigate the colour of snowmake their own snow globemake a barometer, a weathervane and a rain gauge – a storm of science fun!

As well as lots of COOL experiments we look at how a freezer works, tell the story of the snowflake and interview a Penguin Aquarist to find out what it’s like working with those adorable creatures. Kids can marvel at 10 Awesomely Amazing Extreme Weather Events, and learn about polar bears (did you know their fur isn’t actually white?) We also tell the fascinating story of the genius Albert Einstein.

Looking forward to a fun-filled year of science with you guys 🙂

From the WPB team x

November issue : SUPER STRUCTURES & ENGINEERING

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids girls-building-suspension-bridge

Put on your hard hat for this engineering extravaganza! This month Tomorrow’s Engineers Week will be celebrating all the awesome things that engineers do which is why we’ve gone SUPER STRUCTURES mad. We talk to real engineers and find out all about their jobs, discover some of the world’s greatest animal engineers and show your kids how to build a suspension bridge with Lego and string just like the one in the photo above sent in by one of our readers. What a happy mini engineer!

With kids science magazine Whizz Pop Bang just imagine what your kids may one day discover…

Not a subscriber? Don’t worry, you can subscribe here or if you’d like to just buy a single copy of this issue go to our back issue shop.

whizz-pop-bang-science-magazine-for-kids-engineering-issue-cover

Spectacular Science: northern lights

In the current issue of Whizz Pop Bang (October, issue 15) we take a look at light and colour. We ask what gives things their colour? What are invisible colours? Do you know why flamingoes are pink? For lots of questions (and answers!) about colour and loads of cool experiments, order a copy of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids click here.

Do your kids know about the northern lights? The northern lights are one of nature’s most impressive spectacles. These stunning coloured light displays are produced when particles from the Sun crash into the Earth’s atmosphere, transferring their energy into light. Also called aurora, these magnificent dancing lights are common near the North and South Poles.

We came across this eerie yet beautiful video of humpback whales swimming under the northern lights in Norway…

Off the coast of Kvaløya island in Tromsø, humpback whales swim beneath the northern lights. The brief scene was captured by Norwegian photographer Harald Albrigtsen for Norwegian public television (NRK). Cue the aurora science from NASA:

“The typical “northern lights,” or aurora borealis, are caused by collisions between fast-moving electrons and the oxygen and nitrogen in Earth’s upper atmosphere. The electrons – which come from the magnetosphere, the region of space controlled by Earth’s magnetic field – transfer energy to the oxygen and nitrogen gases, making them “excited.” As they “calm down” and return to their normal state, they emit photons, small bursts of energy in the form of light.

When a large number of these collisions occur, the oxygen and nitrogen can emit enough light for the eye to detect. This ghostly light will produce the dance of colors in the night sky we call the aurora. Most of the light comes from altitudes between 60 and 200 miles. Since the aurora is much dimmer than sunlight, it cannot be seen from the ground in the daytime.

The color of the aurora depends on which gas – oxygen or nitrogen – is being excited by the electrons, and on how excited it becomes. Oxygen emits either a greenish-yellow light (the most familiar color of the aurora) or a red light; nitrogen generally gives off a blue light. The blending of these colors can also produce purples, pinks, and white.”

(Above video and text from The Kids Should See This website)

Did you know… Astronauts in the International Space Station get to see a side view of the aurora because they are both roughly the same distance from the Earth

Whizz-Pop-Bang-science-magazine-for-kids-Northern-Lights.jpg

AWESOME FACT: Aurora also occur on other planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

 

Whizz Pop Bang round logo

COLOUR EXPLOSION! A rainbow of science for your kids

whizz-pop-bang-science-magazine-for-kids-issue-15-sweets

SO many reasons to be excited about our awesomely amazing dazzlingly bright October issue of Whizz Pop Bang! This month our awesome science magazine for kids is entitled ‘COLOUR EXPLOSION! A rainbow of science’. Here’s a quick low-down on what you can find inside… MISSION TO JUPITER * INTERVIEW WITH A BUBBLE SCIENTIST * SCIENCE OF LIGHT & COLOUR * CHAMELEONS * ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES * REFRACTION plus NINE EXPERIMENTS AND OUR NEW PULL OUT MAKE & DO SECTION! 

Kids you can experiment and make your own fabric dyes using spices, onion skins and beetroot (we suggest wearing an apron for this one), have yummy fun experimenting with sweets to make colourful patterns. Have a go at making colour changing art, and wow your friends and family with your handmade iridescent paper. There’s loads to make and do in this issue so what are you waiting for?!?

Why have a grey boring old half term, when you could have a whole kaleidoscope of science to brighten up your house! Buy your copy now: www.whizzpopbang.com/subscribe